The Girl Who Loved Tony Jaa

chocolate2008_poster

Taste the fury, because Chocolate (2008) is the Greatest Movie EVER!

Click on the movie poster or the title above to download our review of the film,

featuring Sean ‘Hollywood’ Hunting.

Review in a Nutshell: From the makers of Ong-Bak and The Protector, what I expected from Chocolate and what the movie delivered were two very different things. The central conceit is that the protagonist is an autistic girl with the ability to mimic any martial arts style she sees, but the film is much more dramatic than I anticipated, treating the challenges faced by family members with special needs with a surprising degree of dignity and respect.

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It’s hard out there for a Samurai…

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Make your decisions in the space of seven breaths, because

Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai is the Greatest Movie EVER!

Click on the movie poster or the title above to download our review of the film,

featuring Sean ‘Hollywood’ Hunting.

Review in a Nutshell: I think I pronounce Jim Jarmusch’s last name about ten different ways in this recording about a movie involving urban samurai, aging gangsters, icecream, and a boat on a roof. I don’t even know who I am any more. What year is this?

This movie contains:
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Henry Silva, keeping it real.

Ernie Dickerson Strikes Again!

Break out the turn-tables, because Juice is the Greatest Movie EVER!

Click on the movie poster or the title above to download our review of the film, featuring Sean “Hollywood” Hunting.

Review in a Nutshell:  At times darkly humorous, at times lyrical and surreal, Juice is a crime drama that explores the lives of four poor black youths in the ghettoes of Harlem.  Tupac Shakur delivers a scene-stealing performance.

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Bloodsport, ReDux?

Watch out for pirates, gangsters, and Tibetan monks, because The Quest is the Greatest Movie EVER!

Click on the poster or the movie title above to download our review of the film, featuring Sean “Hollywood” Hunting.

Review in a Nutshell:  Essentially Bloodsport retold in the 1920s, The Quest is Jean-Claude Van Damme’s directorial debut.  It’s a fun but flawed film which includes Roger Moore, elephants, and boatloads of inadvertent homoerotic subtext.