No Chief Brody Jokes, Please.

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Tune up your trucks, because Sorcerer is the Greatest Movie EVER!

Click on the movie poster or the title above to download our review of the film, featuring guest host Oli “InvidNinja92” Bulmer.

Review in a Nutshell: A commercial and critical failure in 1977, Sorcerer has been rediscovered thanks to its release on Bluray. A tense, anxious, and nihilistic film, Sorcerer is considered by some film historians to be one of the last great films of the “New Hollywood” period. Some of the action sequences have to be seen to be believed.

ERRATA: I accidentally referred to the 1950’s movie with the giant, radioactive locusts as The Day the World Ended. The correct title is Beginning of the End.

A Podcast Event 3 Years in the Making

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Man the oars, because Ben-Hur (1959) is the Greatest Movie EVER!

Click on the movie poster or the title above to download our review of the film, featuring Tom Pandich, Internet Terrorist.

Review in a Nutshell: Widely recognized as one of the greatest films in American cinematic history, Ben-Hur is a sprawling, epic tale of revenge and redemption. It’s also a million years long and Chuck Heston has all the on-screen charisma of chunk of granite. Are Tom and I able to pay proper reverence to a film that garnered as many Academy awards as The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King? Tune into find out.

My “Buddy” References are Lacking

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Hold on to your guitar picks, because Six-String Samurai is the Greatest Movie EVER?

Click on the DVD cover or the title above to download our review of the film, featuring Sean “Hollywood” Hunting.

Review in a Nutshell: An independent film with strong production design, a great concept, and a killer soundtrack, Six-String Samurai suffers from questionable comic timing and an inconsistent tone. It’s not as entertaining as I want it to be, although Sean enjoyed it more on a second viewing.

GME! Anime Fun Time Episode #21 – Kiki’s Delivery Service

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In the August entry of GME! Anime Fun Time, Tom and I take an impromptu look at Kiki’s Delivery Service, a 1989 theatrical anime film directed by Hayao Miyazaki and animated by Studio Ghibli. CLICK HERE or on the Bluray cover about to download our review of the film. Discussion includes topics such as depression, adolescence, and sentimentality. There’s also some bonus talk about Flying WitchThe Kingdom of Dreams and Madness, and why Yamcha is the worst character in Dragon Ball Z.

“Draw.”

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Strap on your six guns, because Westworld (1973) is the Greatest Movie EVER!

Click on the movie poster or the title above to download our review of the film, featuring Sean “Hollywood” Hunting.

Review in a Nutshell: A low-budget, high-concept genre film that predates the popular usage of the phrase “computer virus”, Westworld (1973) is a compelling science fiction thriller with solid performances, strong character writing, and special effects that have stood the test of time.

The Only Thing More Treacherous than a Ninja is an Eggplant.

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Practice your secret techniques of Japanese rope-bondage, because Five Element Ninjas is the Greatest Movie EVER!

Click on the DVD cover or the title above to download our review of the film, featuring M.O.M., the Mistress of Malapropisms.

Review in a Nutshell: Combining Chang Cheh’s trademark melodrama with superior athletic skills and hilarious gimmickery, Five Element Ninjas represents the Shaw Brothers at the height of their game as producers of top-quality kung fu films.

Don’t Worry, Kids; The Dolphins Survive

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Watch out for under-cranked stock footage from nature documentaries, because Jaws 3-D is (probably not) the Greatest Movie EVER!

Click on the title or the movie poster above to download our review of the film, featuring Matt “Saint Mort” Kelly from the Horror Movie Night podcast.

Review in a Nutshell: Hamstrung by an implausible premise and gimmicky 3-D camerawork, Jaws 3-D is arguably the nadir of the Jaws films. Despite a surprising amount of talent arrayed before and behind the camera, the film’s plot never quite hits its stride and the cinematography and special effects suffer from the de-conversion process. It’s an odd relic from an early Eighties 3-D revival that never got off the ground.