Not to be Confused with ‘Hard Rain’.

deep_rising_dvd

Gas up the Sea-Doo, because Deep Rising is the Greatest Movie EVER?

Click on the DVD cover or the title above to download our review of the film, featuring guest host Matt “Saint Mort” Kelly of the Horror Movie Night podcast.

Review in a Nutshell: A typical Stephen Summers action-horror movie with some questionable screenwriting and some dodgy CG, Deep Rising is none-the-less remembered fondly by many fans. I am not one of those fans.

‘Rhamphorhynchus’ Is Hard to Pronounce

legend-of-dinosaurs-and-monster-birds-poster

Strap on your scuba gear, because Legend of Dinosaurs and Monster Birds is the Greatest Movie EVER!

Click on the movie poster or the title above to download our review of the film, featuring M.O.M., the Mistress of Malapropisms.

Review in a Nutshell: A groovy, boozy Seventies movie with a fashionably hard-boiled geologist protagonist and a pair of completely inert giant “dinosaurs”, Legend of Dinosaurs and Monster Birds was allegedly the most expensive science fiction film yet produced by Toei Studios when it premiered in 1977. It’s a baffling little creature feature with lots of symbolic camera-work and questionable wardrobe choices.

FINAL THOUGHT:

mon

“Now, pretend like it’s killing you!”

“Ever work tha pickah?”

graveyardshift_poster

Break out the fire hoses, because Graveyard Shift is the Greatest Movie EVER!

Click on the movie poster or the title above to download our review of the film,

featuring Saint Mort of The Saint Mort Show and Horror Movie Night Podcast, both available via Geekscape.net.

Review in a Nutshell: A fun little “creature feature” that completely flies apart in the third act, Graveyard Shift nevertheless has excellent production value, good special effects, and charming performances from a strong cast of character actors.

Spider-pocalypse.

kos

Get the bug spray, because Kingdom of the Spiders is the Greatest Movie EVER!

Click on the DVD cover or the title above to download our review of the film, featuring M.O.M., the Mistress of Malapropisms.

Review in a Nutshell: A low-budget killer critter flick trying to cash in on the popularity of Jaws and The Birds, Kingdom of the Spiders features a surprisingly sharp escalation of tension, a surprisingly bleak conclusion, and an absolutely ridiculous number of adorable, cuddly tarantulas.

Fight the Space-Patriarchy.

brain

Hold onto your gray matter, because The Brain from Planet Arous is the Greatest Movie EVER!

Click on the movie poster or the title above to download our review of the film, featuring Mom.

Review in a Nutshell: A body-snatching science fiction film made on a shoestring budget, The Brain from Planet Arous nevertheless conveys a wonderful sense of tension thanks to the performances of John Agar and Joyce Meadows. There are also some surprisingly creepy special effects, not counting the giant papier-mâché brain.

It Came from Bronson Canyon!

e_v_s

Mix up the DDT, because Earth vs the Spider is the Greatest Movie EVER!

Click on the DVD cover or the title above to download our review of the film, featuring the return of M.O.M..

Review in a Nutshell:  Combining nature footage of an adorable tarantula with some rather rough matte effects, Earth vs the Spider is a cheesy horror movie from the 1950s that nevertheless has a certain charm. Giant invertebrates on the rampage were a common theme back then.

This movie contains:

evs03

Giant Spiders.

evs02

This Lady.

evs01

“Who’s callin’ Hugo?”

No Breakfast Cereal for You, Gillman!

Charge up the Aqualungs, because Creature from the Black Lagoon is the Greatest Movie EVER!

Click on the poster or the movie title above to download our review of the film, featuring Sean “Hollywood” Hunting.

Review in a Nutshell:  Originally a gimmicky 3D horror film, Creature from the Black Lagoon has aged surprisingly well, taking on layers of environmental allegory as newer generations interpret the film.  The special effects and underwater photography are especially strong, but don’t discount the human drama or the sad, lonely state of the movie’s persecuted monster.